Web Architecture, Java Ecosystem, Software Craftsmanship

Test

Best Practices for Unit Testing in Kotlin

Posted on Feb 12, 2018

Best Practices for Unit Testing in Kotlin

Unit Testing in Kotlin is fun and tricky at the same time. We can benefit a lot from Kotlin’s powerful language features to write readable and concise unit tests. But in order to write idiomatic Kotlin test code in the first place, there is a certain test setup required. This post contains best practices and guidelines to write unit test code in Kotlin that is idiomatic, readable, concise and produces reasonable failure messages.

Don't use In-Memory Databases (H2, Fongo) for Tests

Posted on Aug 21, 2017

Don't use In-Memory Databases (H2, Fongo) for Tests

At a first glance, in-memory databases (like H2 or Fongo) look like a good idea. You can test your code without having to worry about installing and managing a dedicated database server up front. Just start your tests and the H2 database will be up and running. However, this comfort comes with severe drawbacks. In this post, I explain my reservations and point out Docker as an alternative which can be easily used with TestContainers or within the Gradle/Maven build.

Testing RESTful Services in Java: Best Practices

Posted on Mar 29, 2016

Testing RESTful Services in Java: Best Practices

Testing RESTful Web Services can be cumbersome because you have to deal with low-level concerns which can make your tests verbose, hard to read and to maintain. Fortunately, there are libraries and best practices helping you to keep your integration tests concise, clean, decoupled and maintainable. This post covers those best practices.

Building a Dropwizard Microservice with Docker and Maven

Posted on Sep 20, 2015

Building a Dropwizard Microservice with Docker and Maven

Dropwizard produces a fat jar containing every dependency your microservice needs to run. This includes a web server. This way, no web server needs to be installed and configured on the target machine. However, there is some infrastructure left (like the JRE) which still has to be installed before the deployment. That’s where Docker enters the stage. With Docker we can produce an artifact containing really everything we need to run our microservice. In this post, we take a look at how we can integrate Docker into our Maven build, run our tests against the container and push the image to a repository.